• 14 Endocrine Disruptors to Eliminate From Your Life Now

    I recently discussed xenoestrogens and their effects on our lives. With their great impact on our overall health, one of the biggest reasons my clients want more information is because of their impact on our waistlines. It’s true, xenoestrogens play a large role in the numbers on the scale. Yes, our standard American diet is mostly to blame; however, if you have up’d your exercise and changed your diet, and still feel bloated, with scale numbers plateauing, your quality of foods can be to blame. Processed foods, meats and dairy fed with estrogen-filled grains, pesticide sprayed vegetables, and toxin-filled by-products are all hormone-disrupting. These not only cause long-term problems to you, but they can make you fat.

    Even if you are not over-weight, eliminating endocrine disruptors should rank high on your priority list. Lowering your cancer risk, balancing your hormones, increasing your fertility, and balancing your thyroid all include taking a look at how your body is consuming and absorbing xenoestrogens. 

    While there are unavoidable environmental xenoestrogens that we breathe in daily, there are also so many ways we can avoid and protect ourselves from consuming them. Educate yourself and invest in yourself; by spending a little more time on reading labels, menu planning, and choosing products, you will lead a healthier life. (You can also help prevent early puberty for your children by eliminating as many of these endocrine disruptors as possible.)

    What To Eliminate From Your Life

    Birth Control

    There are natural, effective birth control alternatives without the side effects of the pills. While preventing pregnancy may be your top concern, these chemically toxic, hormone disruptors can slowly pass poisons into your body, causing the potential risk of cancers and chronic health problems.

    Menstrual Pads and Tampons 

    Avoid tampons and sanitary napkins that contain chlorine, fragrances, wax, surfactants, rayon, etc.

    Coffee Maker

    Your average coffee maker leeches xenoestrogens into your morning Joe through the plastic that makes up its beautiful design. Switching to a stainless steel or glass French Press will eliminate this risk; however, make sure you are not pouring your coffee into a plastic or Styrofoam cup, as the hot coffee will then absorb the xenoestrogens from these cups and allow you to ingest them. 

    Non-Organic Produce

    Synthetic pesticides and insecticides also contain xenoestrogens, so eating organic really is the best way to avoid endocrine-disrupting chemicals in your food.

    Non-Organic Meat and dairy 

    Industrially raised dairy and meat tend to have a lot of xenoestrogens, as they are often given exogenous hormones. You may also limit naturally estrogenic foods, particularly soy, as it can increase the total estrogen levels in the body (and cause an imbalance in your thyroid).

    Plastic Food Containers

    Replace your plastic containers with glass, stainless steel, and ceramic ones. Unfortunately, BPA-free plastic is not safe in most cases, as BPA is only one of the chemicals in plastic known as a xenoestrogen.

    Water Bottles

    Skip the plastic and invest in a canteen or a thermos made out of 100% stainless steel.

    Fabric Softener and Dryer Sheets

    There is not one fabric softener on the market that does not contain endocrine disruptors. While those soft sweaters and even softer sheets feel good, that softer feeling is killing you. 

    Standard Cosmetics, Toothpastes, and Deodorants

    You want to look for products free of aluminum, parabens, and phthalates. Many brands of toothpaste have parabens and fluoride in them, so look for items that avoid these chemicals.

    Soap

    Most hair, body, and hand soaps all have endocrine disruptors within them. Read labels carefully to avoid these toxins. You want to find something natural and organic.

    Perfume

    The chemicals used to create perfume also act as chemical estrogens. They are absorbed into the skin as well as through the nose. 

    Scented Home Products

    Fragrance-filled candles, air fresheners, potpourri are all majority man-made with toxic hormone disruptors. These products are not naturally derived and contain the same chemicals as perfumes, which you will absorb throughout your day – every day after they are used inside your home.

    Cleaning Supplies

    Does a clean house smell really mean clean? The short answer is no. There is a much longer answer here, of course, but those smells are chemically derived and harmful to you and your family. Eliminate the harsh chemicals and use natural alternatives instead.

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  • Xenoestrogens: The Scary Truth

    27 November 2019
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    Commercially raised meat and dairy, cosmetics, food preservatives, pesticides, paints, brake fluids, non-stick cookware, drinking water, nail polish, cleaning supplies, plastic, tampons, toilet paper, soap, perfume, baby bottles, food containers, the list of products containing life-altering chemicals could fill a book. We are drowning in a world consumed with chemicals, and the latest research is enough to scare us even more.

    Xenoestrogens are a sub-category of the endocrine disruptor group that have estrogen-like effects. But to understand this, you must understand the purpose of estrogen within our bodies. It is a natural hormone that is vital for several things including bone growth and fertility. Our bodies should regulate estrogen naturally. However, xenoestrgoens enter the body and trigger an estrogen dominance. They cannot be broken down and are stored in our fat cells. This then causes a myriad of possible health issues.

    There are over 160 types of xenoestrogens currently known, with an unknown amount still to be uncovered. These toxic elements are are linked to the following:

    • Brain development
    • Behavior
    • Blood abnormalities
    • Female infertility
    • Male infertility
    • Testicle shrinkage
    • Lower sperm counts
    • Asthma
    • Allergies
    • Low birth weight
    • Kidney disease
    • Thyroid disease
    • High cholesterol
    • Skin cancer 
    • Bladder cancer
    • Lung cancer
    • Breast cancer
    • Prostate cancer
    • Pancreas cancer
    • Brain cancer
    • Testicular cancer
    • Obesity
    • Endometriosis
    • Early onset of puberty
    • Miscarriages
    • Diabetes

    They also interfer with the way testosterone communicates with cells, lowering testosterone and altering thyroid hormone levels. They are found in 99% of Americans, and are traceable in the womb and breastmilk.

    Xenoestrogens can be either naturally derived or synthetic, with the most common natural presence occurring in a variety of foods. This does not make them safe to consume. Soy is the most well-known food to contain xenoestrogens. The problem becomes worse when considering that most of our soy production is also genetically modified and non-organic. Synthetic xenoestrogens are molecules produced by chemical synthesis, which are used in industrial products and pharmaceutical estrogens, and are known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). 

    EDCs are defined as compounds that “interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action, or elimination of natural hormones in the body that are responsible for the development, behavior, fertility and maintenance of homeostasis”

    The World Health Organization (WHO) states that endocrine disrupters are associated with “altered reproductive function in males and females, increased incidence of breast cancer, abnormal growth patterns and neurodevelopmental delays in children, as well as changes in immune function.” This should be a wake-up call. It is not just a simple study that has been buried and is easily overlooked. The WHO continues to describe how human exposure to EDCs occur through everything from ingesting foods, drinking tap water, and inhaling dust particles and gases through the skin. They can be transferred during pregnancy to a fetus through the placenta, and are also passed while breastfeeding.

    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) states that  it is now “widely known that most humans are continually exposed to these potentially dangerous substances. This is proven by the increasing incidence of many endocrine related disorders, comprising genital malformation, neurobehavioral disorders and the increased global rates of endocrine-related cancers.”

    The risk is real – and is involves everyone from infants to adults, and all genders and races. Women seem more susceptible due to their exposure to cosmetics, etc, but xenoestrogens can impact everyone. It has been shown that exposure to EDCs while in the womb or throughout the earliest years of life may manifest only later in life or even lay dormant and be passed down to future generations. 

    What can you do?

    • Do not take birth control pills or select conventional hormone replacement therapy (HRT)
    • Skip the tap water
    • Eat organic, locally grown foods
    • Peel non-organic fruits and veggies after washing
    • Shop the outside of the grocery store and avoid processed items or anything containing additives
    • Avoid soy and soy protein
    • Do not use dryer sheets (they are full of xenoestrogens)
    • Avoid non-organic menstrual products
    • Read cosmetic labels
    • Avoid all pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides.
    • Buy hormone-free meats and dairy
    • Do not microwave plastic
    • Use glass instead of plastic
    • Use a chlorine filter on shower heads and filter drinking water
    • Use chemical free soaps and toothpastes
    • Read the labels on condoms

    Postmenopausal women with higher risk of developing breast cancer should avoid xenoestrogen intake due to their possible capacity to stimulate proliferation in sensible tissue.

    Synthetic Xenoestrogens Activities Sources
    4-tert-Octylphenol Negatively affects pregnancy and development Generally found in plastic and, consequently, as contaminants in foodstuff, fruits and vegetables.
    Benzylbutylphtalate Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Bisphenol A (BPA) Correlated with hormone related cancer
    Alteration neuroendocrine system
    Altered development observed in aquatic species
    Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Bisphenol A glucuronide Generates adipogenesis (in vivo)
    Bisphenol S Cardiotoxicity
    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Dibutyl phtalate Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Terephtalic acid In vitro estrogenic effect
    Tetrachlorobisphenol A More toxic than BPA, Potentially carginogenic
    Ethynil estradiol Reduced fertility and fecundity Pharmaceuticals (found in aquatic environment)
    Behavior changes in aquatic species
    Bytylparaben Personal care products1
    Ethylparaben In vitro estrogenic activity
    Methylparaben Increased breast cancer risk
    Butylated hydroxyanisole In vitro estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity Food preservatives
    Benzophenone-2 In vitro estrogenic activity UV Filters in cosmetic and topical sunscreens1
    4-Methylbenzylidene Camphor Highly diffused in aquatic environment
    Polychlorinated biphenyls Neurological and hormonal diseases Used as coolant, plasticizers and pesticides and found in several food supplies
    Chlordecone Associated with hormone related cancer Pesticides (fruits and vegetables)
    Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene
    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Hydroxyphenyltrichloroethane
    Methoxychlor
    TCDD Carcinogenicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity reproductive and developmental toxicity
    Synthetic Xenoestrogens Activities Sources
    4-tert-Octylphenol Negatively affects pregnancy and development Generally found in plastic and, consequently, as contaminants in foodstuff, fruits and vegetables.
    Benzylbutylphtalate Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Bisphenol A (BPA) Correlated with hormone related cancer
    Alteration neuroendocrine system
    Altered development observed in aquatic species
    Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Bisphenol A glucuronide Generates adipogenesis (in vivo)
    Bisphenol S Cardiotoxicity
    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Dibutyl phtalate Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Terephtalic acid In vitro estrogenic effect
    Tetrachlorobisphenol A More toxic than BPA, Potentially carginogenic
    Ethynil estradiol Reduced fertility and fecundity Pharmaceuticals (found in aquatic environment)
    Behavior changes in aquatic species
    Bytylparaben Personal care products1
    Ethylparaben In vitro estrogenic activity
    Methylparaben Increased breast cancer risk
    Butylated hydroxyanisole In vitro estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity Food preservatives
    Benzophenone-2 In vitro estrogenic activity UV Filters in cosmetic and topical sunscreens1
    4-Methylbenzylidene Camphor Highly diffused in aquatic environment
    Polychlorinated biphenyls Neurological and hormonal diseases Used as coolant, plasticizers and pesticides and found in several food supplies
    Chlordecone Associated with hormone related cancer Pesticides (fruits and vegetables)
    Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene
    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane Negatively affects pregnancy and development
    Hydroxyphenyltrichloroethane
    Methoxychlor
    TCDD Carcinogenicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity reproductive and developmental toxicity Environmental contaminant

     

     

    Resources:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3388472/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28013213

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6104637/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26337277

    http://www.who.int/ceh/risks/cehemerging2/en

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