• The Wonders of the Neti Pot

    Photo Credit: dudeiwantthat.com

    Dr. Brenda Fairchild

    The Wonders of the Neti Pot

    As many of you know… I can talk about the neti pot all day.  I think this product is one of the greatest inventions of modern times!!  Now, I know not everyone loves to see and feel the neti pot doing its job, but it is a wonderful way to naturally rid your sinuses of congestion and infections.  And when you are pregnant and not a lot of options as far as decongestants go, this is a wonderful alternative!!

    The word Neti means “nasal cleansing” and comes from ancient India.  It has been around for over 5,000 years!!!  Yoga masters used this technique to help with mediation. They felt they could get to a higher and deeper state of mind.  Some yogi’s also believed it helped with mood swings and addictions as well.  The neti pot was then massed produced in the early 1970s and has since become a favorite for those of us looking to relieve the sinus pressure naturally!

    Benefits of the Neti Pot

    • Lessen the time of cold, flu, or allergy
    • Relieve the pressure of sinus headaches
    • Help reduce pollen from the nasal passage
    • Remove mucous
    • Allows for easier breathing
    • Great for post nasal drip
    • Allows for easier breathing

    Using the neti pot is pretty simple and oddly satisfying.  You can get a simple pot at most of the chain stores.  And most come with packets of sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride.  Usually under $20.  You can get ceramic to metal ones at health food stores or online.  Now, from personal experiences, I highly suggest the packets!!  I have tried just plain water, and it did not feel well.  But, it is all up to you.  I like to use filtered water if I can.  I don’t use it all the time, but I try to as much as possible. 

    How to use the Neti Pot

    Add one packet to the warm water and let them mix.  I like to start with draining my most clogged nasal passage first.  This means the pot is pouring the water into the good side and the clogged side is towards the sink.  And let the magic begin!!  I use about half the pot per nasal passage.  Depending on what is going on with you our your child, the nasal mucous could be green or yellow which could be an infection to clear which could be allergies.  When in doubt, call your primary physician.  If there is a bad infection, there may be some blood mixed in.  When you have done one side, gently blow your nose.  You want to rid the body of the mucus, which is inflammation.  I always tell my patients “better out than in!”  You will instantly feel the pressure release!!!  It is amazing!!!  

    I start to use the neti pot at the first sign of a cold coming on.  I will do this 3-4 times a day if it is really bad.  And use that over the course of 2-3 days if need be.  It really cuts down the time of the cold or allergy.  And can help you get some sleep at night due to your breathing better!  

    Other recommendations to follow the neti pot.  Get Adjusted!!!  It helps with aligning your body and helps with draining your sinuses as well.  Watch your dairy, gluten, wheat, and sugar as they can be inflammatory.   Stay hydrated with water.  Get Sleep and make sure you are getting you vitamin D!

    https://yogainternational.com/article/view/the-history-science-of-the-nasal-wash

    Continue Reading
  • Gestational Diabetes Testing

    12 January 2017
    1654 Views
    Comments are off for this post

     

    What is Gestational Diabetes?

    The body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose and causes insulin to be released.  The insulin pulls the glucose from the blood and transfers it to the cells to be stored for energy.  When a woman is pregnant, the body leaves some glucose in the blood so that it can be passed to the baby through the placenta and umbilical cord.

    Gestational Diabetes is diagnosed when there is too high of an amount of glucose found in the blood while pregnant. It needs to be taken seriously, as it is associated with a risk of congenital defects and other complications.  Women who develop gestational diabetes are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27254892

    Science has not found one specific cause for gestational diabetes, but the following are all possible links:

    • Obesity
    • Family Genetics
    • Diet high in carbohydrates and sugar
    • Stress
    • Autoimmune Issues
    • Pre-diabetes: blood glucose levels higher than normal, but not high enough to be labeled diabetes
    • African American, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latina, or Pacific Islander American heritage
    • PCOS

     

    The Dangers and Complications of Gestational Diabetes Include:

    • Increased chance of C-Section
    • Risk of needing a NICU
    • Shoulder Dystocia
    • Congenital Defects
    • Macrosomia: A larger than average (6-9lb) baby at full-term birth
    • Fetal Hyperinsulinemia
    • Jaundice
    • Preeclampsia

     

    Gestational Diabetes effects between 5-9% of pregnancies and typically occurs in the last 20 weeks. As the baby grows, the placenta produces more insulin hormone blockers.  This leaves excess insulin in the mother’s body.

    How is Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed?

    You may experience signs of Gestational Diabetes before you receive a positive test result.  Some signs include:

    • Unusual thirst
    • Frequent urination
    • Fatigue
    • Nausea
    • Frequent vaginal, bladder, and skin infections
    • Blurred vision

    It has become common practice for every pregnant woman to be tested for gestational diabetes.  It is unclear if this is truly necessary to test every woman, but because this condition can effect both mother and baby, women willingly oblige.

    The American Pregnancy Association currently recommends what is called a “two step approach” for screening for gestational diabetes between 24-28 weeks gestation. The first step is a glucose challenge test (GCT).  During the GCT, the woman is given Glucola, a sugar drink, and then has her blood sugar level tested one hour after consuming said drink.  If the results are above the normal range, the woman will come back to perform a 3-hour version of the test.

    Glucola: The Toxic Drink

    Glucola includes ingredients such as brominated soybean oil (BVO), food dyes, sodium benzonate, BHA, sodium hexametaphosphate, dextrose, and ‘natural flavorings.’

    All of these pose the question of safety with consumption.  Preservatives and food dyes alone should raise a red flag, but what’s worse?  This drink actually contains an ingredient that is found in flame retardant products. BVO accumulates in the organs of the body and has been associated with heart lesions, fatty changes in the liver, and impaired growth and behavioral development. Studies link BVO to neurological problems, fertility problems, changes in thyroid hormones and early puberty. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6665731

    This drink should not be recommended for consumption for anyone, especially to a pregnant woman.

    Alternative Test Options

    Instead of consuming Glucola, these options may be more appealing:

    • 50 GM of Organic Grape Juice (or apple juice)
    • 50 GM of Jelly Beans (Just over 50 beans): (grab the non-GMO, naturally colored version)
    • Glucolift is a natural, non-GMO, artificial colors & flavors free glucose tablet. It’s made for people with type 1 diabetes who need to raise their blood sugar regularly throughout the day.
    • 50 GM Breakfast Meal: this is what I personal suggest, as it lets the body digest and process real food.  It can consist of several options, so talk to your birth team or research which you would most prefer.

    Meals typically include eggs, juice, toast, and fruit, but some midwives or doctors include pancakes!  It is harder to be exact with glucose levels of real food, but the body processes real food the easiest and will give you the least chances of any stomach aches afterward.

    You have the ability to request any of the above options for your test, or the right to refuse the test all together. 

     

    Continue Reading
  • Managing Gestational Diabetes Naturally

    8 October 2016
    3162 Views
    Comments are off for this post

    Once you have learned that you have gestational diabetes, it is up to you to handle your blood sugar levels.  The American Diabetes Association states that there is no known cure for gestational diabetes, but that treating the condition is done in two ways: Diet and Exercise.

    Even if you are required to monitor your glucose levels daily and administer insulin shots, you will still be asked to change your diet and increase your exercise level. (Always ask to alter your lifestyle and retest before accepting insulin shots.)

    As a chiropractor, I have had the opportunity to discuss this topic in length with many clients. I’m going to break down my gestational diabetes diet and exercise recommendations into easy to manage ideas that you can incorporate into your daily life without feeling deprived, and at the same time lower your chances of having a c-section. Remember to consult your midwife or doctor before altering your lifestyle drastically.

     

    Diet

    The Standard American Diet (SAD) does not meet our nutritional needs.  6-11 servings of breads and grains per day? Are you kidding? That’s a diabetic’s nightmare.  It’s easy to see just why so many people are experiencing conditions such as gestational diabetes.  We are addicted to sugar and other foods that break down into sugar.  We cannot let go of dairy or pesticide-sprayed gluten and wheat.  We can’t put down the GMO-filled, processed products.  But we are suffering.  Not only are we suffering, but our children are too – even in utero.

    You do not have to wait until the diagnosis has been handed to you before you change your diet.  Ideally, you should alter and follow a healthier diet and lifestyle before you are pregnant, or at least once pregnancy is confirmed.  But, if you are now wondering how to help manage your condition, then it is definitely time to reevaluate your diet:

    DROP ALL PROCESSED FOODS.   If it comes in a box or bag, drop it.

    Stay away from sugar.

    Eat every 2-3 hours – including a midnight snack. It is recommended to eat small meals every 2-3 hours so your body becomes used to regularly processing and absorbing nutrients, which helps to prevent the highs and lows of blood sugar levels that characterize diabetes.

    Keep carbohydrates to a minimum and eat them in the middle of the day. Complex carbohydrates break down to more valuable forms of sugar that are harder to digest and have less of an impact on the insulin fluctuations in your body. Eliminating simple carbohydrates could help prevent or treat gestational diabetes.

    Increase your protein.  One of the important functions of protein is to help break down carbohydrates. Eating at least 85-120g of protein a day is essential for optimal pregnancy health and fetal development. If you are eating whole-food carbohydrate, pair it with protein. This will ease the digestive process and regulate your metabolism to only release or utilize the necessary amounts of insulin.

     

    Follow the Brewer’s Pregnancy Diet or other high protein, low carbohydrate/sugar diet.  This will give you a great way to track your food and influence your decisions.

     

    Increase your fiber. Fiber can stimulate the activity of insulin receptors and can also inhibit the release of excess insulin into the bloodstream, helping to balance the levels of insulin and prevent the onset of diabetes.

    Foods to include:

    • Flaxseed (fiber)
    • Brewer’s Yeast (natural chromium)
    • Eggs (Free range, organic if possible – 1-2 each day): Eggs are high in choline, which helps promote baby’s growth and brain development.
    • Whole Fat Yogurt (or greek yogurt): avoid added fruits and sugars
    • Grass Fed Meat (local or organic if possible)
    • Grass Fed Butter
    • Avocados
    • Wild Caught Fish (salmon especially): high in omega-3’s
    • Tomatoes: The main antioxidant in tomatoes is Lycopene, which has been linked to the reduction of preeclampsia.
    • Sweet Potatoes: Full of antioxidants, vitamins A, C and B6, folate and fiber
    • Dark, Leafy Greens: Full of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Spinach is also a great source of non-dairy calcium and fiber.
    • Beans: Full of fiber, protein, folate, iron, calcium and zinc.
    • Nuts
    • Berries
    • Apples (Pair with a protein like peanut butter)
    • Citrus Fruits
    • Pears
    • Broccoli
    • Cabbage
    • Mushrooms
    • Peppers
    • Onions
    • Green Beans
    • Olives
    • Lentils
    • Oats
    • Quinoa
    • Okra
    • Carrots
    • Chia Seeds
    • Fats/Oils: animal fats, coconut oil, olive oil, olives, avocados, fish oils, etc. should be high quality.

     

    Note that some fruit and vegetables effect blood sugar levels more than others.  For example, the following should be eaten with protein:

    • Ripe Bananas
    • Melon
    • Pineapple

    Foods to Avoid:

    • White Foods –  White potatoes, white rice, white bread, white pasta.
    • Candy, Cookies, Cakes – Sweets in general.
    • Processed Products: Processed, packaged, and most restaurant food quality is impossible to predict.

     

    Supplements to Consider: (Again, talk to your doctor before adding or altering your diet or supplements.)

    • Vitamin D
    • Vitamin C
    • Chromium – it is used up whenever sugar or flour is digested.  It naturally runs low in the third trimester, but an unhealthy diet completely depletes it.  (Some people have seen drastic results in their glucose numbers with two weeks of supplementing with chromium.)
    • Inositol- studies show improved insulin sensitivity and decreased glucose levels with the use of inositol while pregnant.
    • Dandelion Herb
    • Alfalfa
    • Kelp
    • Astragalus – Research shows that astragalus (along with traditional treatments for gestational diabetes) is linked to significantly better blood sugar control and milder symptoms of gestational diabetes.

     

    Exercise

    One hour of exercise each day, even broken into two 30 minute sessions is enough to help raise the heartrate for the body to manage weight gain, prevent or manage gestational diabetes, and help maintain a healthy pregnancy overall.  While walking technically is exercise, you need to make sure that it is more than a leisurely stroll.  The body doesn’t truly recognize your normal walking pace as needing an increased heartrate.

    Great ways to exercise while pregnant:

    • Continue your normal exercise routine, if you have been active.
    • Enroll in prenatal classes, such as bootcamps, yoga, aerobics, or basic prenatal fitness.
    • Walk farther and quicker than your leisurely pace, trying to break a small sweat.
    • Swimming
    • Biking
    • Hiking
    • Elliptical or other stationary equipment
    • Strength Training with or without weights

    It is also worth northing that Berberine has been shown to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism in vitro.

     

    Resources
    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/gestational/how-to-treat-gestational.html

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2410097/

    http://gestationaldiabetesrecipes.com/eating-well/

    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/05/27/insanity–babies-given-antiobesity-drugs-in-the-womb.aspx

    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/11/02/top-pregnancy-foods.aspx

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27281802

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25332324

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21610860

    Continue Reading