Epsom Salt Baths: Do Your Body a Favor

17 July 2019
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I was asked an interesting question the other day during an appointment. I had a client ask me if Epsom Salt baths were something she should be taking regularly. Before even blinking, I told her that they were a wonderful addition to life, and that they were a great way to relax, detox, and soothe muscles. I moved on with my day without much of a second thought. However, I realized that, while Epsom Baths are typically recommended, and that the magnesium has to be helpful for all logical reasons, I had never done the research myself. 

So here I sit, telling you how disappointed I am in the lack of scientific evidence that has been performed on this great product for the bath tub (and in other aspects of life). I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest that researchers do not have the funding or the interest in such a small wives’ tale. That does not mean that it is not worth including in your life, though. Plenty of evidence backs its use for overall health!

While my writings won’t be based purely on Epsom Salt Bath studies, they will include research on magnesium and how the skin absorbs and delivers to the blood, cells, and tissue of the body. 

Why I Recommend Epsom Salt Baths

‘Epsom salt is different from traditional salt in that it’s actually a mineral compound of magnesium and sulfate, and is technically known as magnesium sulfate. It’s composed of tiny, colorless crystals that look like table salt, but it’s actually a completely different thing, as table salt is made up of sodium chloride. Magnesium sulfate is a mineral that many of us are lacking in, as levels have been decreasing over the last three to four decades around the world.’

While we know magnesium is needed in order to increase our health statistics, there is also research showing its powerful anti-inflammatory benefits and exfoliating capabilities.

Epsom salt baths have many well-documented benefits:

  • They should help improve circulation and possibly prevent cardiovascular illnesses by decreasing inflammation and protecting the arteries. Healthier arteries means less risk of blood clots, plaque build-up, and damage to arterial walls. 
  • Strains, sprains, and swollen areas can be aided with an Epsom soak.
  • It can help to repair muscle damage and offset delayed inflammation.
  • Magnesium is a natural stress reliever, and a bath improves the mood.
  • Epsom Salt baths are known for relieving tension, pain, and cramping.
  • It aids in many enzymatic functions, helps to regulate fluid retention in cells, and facilitates the body’s use of calcium to transmit chemical signals throughout the nervous system.
  • An Epsom salt bath can promote detoxification all over the skin.
  • For women, an Epsom bath can positively impact PMS, hormonal migraines, endometriosis, and polycystic ovarian syndrome.
  • Epsom salt helps you sleep because the magnesium relaxes muscles, improves digestion, balances blood pressure, and in turn, gives you more energy after more restful sleep.
  • According to Dr. Joe Matusic, a pediatrician in Charleston, W.Va., and an assistant clinical professor of pediatrics at the Charleston division of the West Virginia University School of Medicine, Epsom salt can help soothe common summer ailments that itch or burn the skin. This includes mosquito bites, bee stings, mild sunburn, poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. To apply, either create a compress with a washcloth, cold water and Epsom salt, or take an Epsom salt bath. Epsom salt works by drawing the moisture out of lesions caused by rashes, and reducing the swelling caused by bites or stings.

Even if it’s a placebo effect, I have never heard of someone not finding benefits with 1-2 cups of Epsom Salt mixed in with their warm bath water. I highly recommend adding this relaxing (and inexpensive) ritual to your life!

 

Reference:

https://www.epsomsaltcouncil.org/uses-benefits/health/